When Dimple Met Rishi-A Book Review

When Dimple Met Rishi

When Dimple Met Rishi is about two soon-to-be college freshmen who attend a summer program for web development in San Francisco. Dimple is passionate about coding and creating an app that’s focused on healthcare. Rishi plans on going to MIT to study computer science and engineering. They are also in an arranged marriage by their parents. Wait, what?

I got introduced to this book through YouTube, specifically through a video from That Bookie. Thanks to my local library, I was able to check this book out. (Get it?) I devoured this book in a matter of hours and I did not want it to end. With Valentine’s Day coming around, this book is a wonderful read to get you in a romantic comedy mood. This could easily be made into a Bollywood rom-com.

Arranged marriages sound very weird to most young adults in the 21st century, but Rishi and Dimple both come from traditional Indian families and as such, their parents decide to have them meet at the summer web development program to see if they can hit it off. Like all romantic comedies, Rishi and Dimple don’t start off on the right foot. When they get partnered up as a team, however, they start to develop a friendship that slowly, but surely develops into an adorable romance.

Dimple is a thoroughly modern lady, geeky and sweet, but determined to not define herself by her looks or her relationships and the last thing she wants is to be married. On the other hand, Rishi is a romantic, very devout in his Hindu beliefs and passionate about something beyond a career in computers or engineering. They’re both hardworking people with way more integrity than the “Aberzombies” in the summer program who act as the main antagonists in this novel.

From a writing perspective, the storytelling is wonderful. It tells the romance from Dimple and Rishi’s viewpoints in a third person limited perspective. The voices are distinctive and I feel very close to both of the characters. Dimple may seem like your typical Tumblr Soapbox Sadie, but she loves her family and genuinely wants to use her passion to make a difference in the world. Rishi comes off as a sweet, classy gentleman, but his desire to be a dutiful son conflicts with his passion for making art and comic books.

My only nitpick with this particular novel is that there’s a small hookup scene. I hope that I don’t sound like a prude, but I would think that the more traditionally-minded Rishi would think to wait a little longer. The good news is that the hookup scene isn’t graphic. It’s a PG-13 hookup scene and it’s a sweet one. But if hookup scenes aren’t your thing, you can just skip over the pages without any issue.

What I love most about this particular novel is that Dimple and Rishi bring out the best in each other. Rishi learns that he can live for himself without disappointing his family while Dimple realizes that finding true love doesn’t mean conforming to the traditional idea of domesticity.

I wish there was an epilogue in this book. I can already see it, actually. Years later, after Dimple and Rishi finish college, they get married and everyone will laugh about how they fist met. Even though Rishi comes from a very wealthy family, Dimple will technically be making more money than him as an app developer while Rishi will go the route of Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman and publish his comic book series independently.

If you’re a hopeless romantic, I highly recommend this book. Some of the vocabulary will be lost in translation, but it’s a lighthearted, sweet read. And seriously, Bollywood, make this a movie!

The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love: A Book Review

geeks-guide-to-unrequited-love

I bought The Geek’s Guide to Unrequited Love last year while working on my own novel for NaNoWriMo. As someone who loves conventions, cosplay, and geek/nerd life in general, I knew that I would love this book as soon as I read the summary.

The “geek” in question from the title of the book is sixteen year old Graham William Posner, “lanky, pale, glasses, with a penchant for fantasy worlds.” He has a crush on his best friend, Roxy and hopes that going to New York Comic Con with her would provide him with the opportunity for him to confess his feelings, especially when one of the guests at NYCC is Robert Zinc, a reclusive comic book writer who is stepping out of the shadows for the first time in forever. Of course, things don’t go the way Graham hopes, especially when Roxy hits it off with a guy she meets at the con.

As Graham tries to get the best NYCC experience possible and impress Roxy in the process, the reader is treated to a very genuine perspective of what it’s like to be at a con: the costumes, the merch, the panels, and  all the unique events that fans get to go to. All the while,  Graham continually fails at impressing Roxy and eventually learns that his feelings are unrequited.

What makes this book work is that you really root for Graham and he never acts like he’s entitled to Roxy’s love. He gets jealous of the new guy, but he eventually learns that it’s okay to not get the girl. The book may not end with the conventional happily ever after, but I still love it because by the time the story ends, you see how much Graham has matured and his desires change towards things bigger than just getting the girl.

I recommend this book to all my nerdy friends and to people who can learn a thing or two about being in love. We’ve all experienced unrequited love and this book shows how people can deal with it in a healthy way without friendships taking collateral damage. It’s refreshing to find a story that focuses more on selfless love and friendship rather than the tired love triangles and “pretty people problems” you see in every other YA novel.

We need more books like this!