When Dimple Met Rishi-A Book Review

When Dimple Met Rishi

When Dimple Met Rishi is about two soon-to-be college freshmen who attend a summer program for web development in San Francisco. Dimple is passionate about coding and creating an app that’s focused on healthcare. Rishi plans on going to MIT to study computer science and engineering. They are also in an arranged marriage by their parents. Wait, what?

I got introduced to this book through YouTube, specifically through a video from That Bookie. Thanks to my local library, I was able to check this book out. (Get it?) I devoured this book in a matter of hours and I did not want it to end. With Valentine’s Day coming around, this book is a wonderful read to get you in a romantic comedy mood. This could easily be made into a Bollywood rom-com.

Arranged marriages sound very weird to most young adults in the 21st century, but Rishi and Dimple both come from traditional Indian families and as such, their parents decide to have them meet at the summer web development program to see if they can hit it off. Like all romantic comedies, Rishi and Dimple don’t start off on the right foot. When they get partnered up as a team, however, they start to develop a friendship that slowly, but surely develops into an adorable romance.

Dimple is a thoroughly modern lady, geeky and sweet, but determined to not define herself by her looks or her relationships and the last thing she wants is to be married. On the other hand, Rishi is a romantic, very devout in his Hindu beliefs and passionate about something beyond a career in computers or engineering. They’re both hardworking people with way more integrity than the “Aberzombies” in the summer program who act as the main antagonists in this novel.

From a writing perspective, the storytelling is wonderful. It tells the romance from Dimple and Rishi’s viewpoints in a third person limited perspective. The voices are distinctive and I feel very close to both of the characters. Dimple may seem like your typical Tumblr Soapbox Sadie, but she loves her family and genuinely wants to use her passion to make a difference in the world. Rishi comes off as a sweet, classy gentleman, but his desire to be a dutiful son conflicts with his passion for making art and comic books.

My only nitpick with this particular novel is that there’s a small hookup scene. I hope that I don’t sound like a prude, but I would think that the more traditionally-minded Rishi would think to wait a little longer. The good news is that the hookup scene isn’t graphic. It’s a PG-13 hookup scene and it’s a sweet one. But if hookup scenes aren’t your thing, you can just skip over the pages without any issue.

What I love most about this particular novel is that Dimple and Rishi bring out the best in each other. Rishi learns that he can live for himself without disappointing his family while Dimple realizes that finding true love doesn’t mean conforming to the traditional idea of domesticity.

I wish there was an epilogue in this book. I can already see it, actually. Years later, after Dimple and Rishi finish college, they get married and everyone will laugh about how they fist met. Even though Rishi comes from a very wealthy family, Dimple will technically be making more money than him as an app developer while Rishi will go the route of Peter Laird and Kevin Eastman and publish his comic book series independently.

If you’re a hopeless romantic, I highly recommend this book. Some of the vocabulary will be lost in translation, but it’s a lighthearted, sweet read. And seriously, Bollywood, make this a movie!

And The Oscar Goes To…

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There’s been a hashtag going around you might’ve seen called #OscarsSoWhite. This hashtag was made in response to the lack of diversity in this year’s batch of Oscar nominees. Directors such as Spike Lee and actors like Jada Pinkett Smith are calling for an Oscar Boycott.

While I agree that there are movies out there that may not have deserved the Oscars they were nominated for (Looking at you, Birdman), it’s not like movies with diverse leads have never been nominated before. Last year, Selma was nominated for Best Picture. The year before that, 12 Years a Slave won 3 Oscars.

Straight Outta Compton may not be nominated for Best Picture, but it’s still up for Best Original Screenplay, which is saying a lot because it’s competing against Bridge of Spies, Ex MachinaInside Out, and Spotlight, all of which are really good movies.

So it’s not like the Oscars have never considered films with diversity before.  So my first question is “Is this proof of an issue or projecting?”

We have seen evidence that diversity in media can work on its own merits. Biggest example being Hamilton, which is universally appealing, but doesn’t shove its messages of diversity and feminism down the audience’s throat. What makes Hamilton work is the characters, the music, the familiar tragic storyline, and the real message: Legacy depends on your actions and those you leave behind to tell your story. You can’t just go around complaining that people are being unfair and say “Screw you guys, I’ma going home.” I’m not completely sure if boycotts work, but last time I checked, the African-American acting community has their own awards going on.

Not to mention that there’s also this question: What about other ethnicities? America Ferrera and and Eva Longoria made a joke about how Latina actresses get mistaken for other Latina actresses. There are people out there making independent short films and diversity in television, so the constant laments about the lack of diversity in Hollywood aren’t always well-founded.

Hollywood (or at the very least the people of Twitter and Tumblr) can never be satisfied when it comes to representation. It’s crazy enough that a movie like The Danish Girl and Carol are even getting the attention that they’re getting, but according to social media, it’s not enough because the leads aren’t played by trangender/lesbian actors. Mad Max: Fury Road is actually nominated, whereas most of the time, action movies would probably get the snub or just get the token “Special Effects and Sound” nominations. Jennifer Lawrence is nominated for being the lead in a movie about a female entrepreneur and yet it’s not enough. I am mad that Charlize Theron isn’t nominated for Best Actress, though.

You know what I’m actually more angry about when it comes to the Oscars? The fact that Fifty Shades of Grey  is still getting attention through one of the songs from the movie getting a Best Original Song nomination. I’m also not a big fan of Chris Rock and I’m already cringing at the jokes that might come from him. I’m also mad that Star Wars: The Force Awakens got the token “Sound Editing/Mixing” and “Best Visual Effects” nominations. Highest grossing movie of the year and you’re just gonna give it those awards? At least give a nod to the actors who played Finn and Rey and Kylo Ren.

If you want to give voice to issues relating to diversity, there are bigger issues to deal with such as why is more attention being given to Donald Trump rather than the more sane presidential nominees? How can we balance out violence caused by the police and the retaliations that happen because of police killing innocent kids? What about abortion and the fact that most abortion clinics are in poor communities and that most babies who are aborted are black?

I’m not completely sure if I’m gonna watch the Oscars. I am rooting for a good number of movies to win. But given the bad taste in my mouth from Neil Patrick Harris’s hosting and the fact that the award show goes on forever, I might just find better uses for my time.